Testosterone injection therapy

Testosterone, like many anabolic steroids, was classified as a controlled substance in 1991. Testosterone is administered parenterally in normal and delayed-release (depot) forms. In September 1995, the FDA approved testosterone transdermal patches (Androderm), and many transdermal forms and brands are now available including implants, gels, and topical solutions. A testosterone buccal system, Striant, was FDA-approved in July 2003; Striant is a mucoadhesive product that adheres to the buccal mucosa and provides a controlled and sustained release of testosterone. In May 2014, the FDA approved an intranasal gel formulation of testosterone (Natesto). A transdermal patch (Intrinsa) for hormone replacement in women is under investigation; the daily dosages used in women are much lower than for products used in males. The FDA refused approval for Intrinsa in 2004 stating that more data regarding safety, especially in relation to cardiovascular and breast health, were required.

Testosterone cypionate (Depo-Testosterone), testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl), testosterone undecanoate (Aveed), and testosterone pellet (Testopel) are forms of testosterone injection used to treat symptoms of low testosterone in men who have hypogonadism (a condition in which the body does not produce enough natural testosterone). Testosterone is used only for men with low testosterone levels caused by certain medical conditions, including disorders of the testicles, pituitary gland, (a small gland in the brain), or hypothalamus (a part of the brain) that cause hypogonadism. Your doctor will order certain lab tests to check your testosterone levels to see if they are low before you begin to use testosterone injection. Testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl) and testosterone pellet (Testopel) are also used to stimulate puberty in males with delayed puberty. Testosterone enanthate (Delatestryl) injection may be used in certain women with a type of breast cancer called mammary cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Testosterone should not be used to treat the symptoms of low testosterone in men who have low testosterone due to aging ('age related hypogonadism'). Testosterone is in a class of medications called androgenic hormones. Testosterone is a hormone produced by the body that contributes to the growth, development, and functioning of the male sexual organs and typical male characteristics. Testosterone injection works by supplying synthetic testosterone to replace the testosterone that is normally produced naturally in the body. When used to treat breast cancer, testosterone works by stopping the release of estrogen.

When we perform testosterone injections we do not arbitrarily stick a needle into the muscle; there are specific points within each muscle that you want to use. Youve probably seen movies or . shows where some guy is supplementing with anabolic steroids and it shows him arbitrarily sticking a needle right into the meat of his butt and then shows him on the field as an animal; in real life that wouldnt happen as he would be temporarily paralyzed. The sciatic nerve runs through our glutes, often the area many movies portray the injection and if you hit the never youre not going to be moving for some time. Each area, each muscle has a spot that may be used and when we know the spots the process is very simple; in reality its no different than eating food its just most dont know how to do it. For example, you wouldnt take a hamburger and try to jam it into your eyeball to eat it, of course not, you know better and testosterone injections are no different.

Testosterone injection therapy

testosterone injection therapy

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